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Engaging

This page contains resources to enrich your exploration of Pulitzer Prize-winning writing, including free educational materials and updates about additional programs, events and other activities. Check back here often as we will be adding new content as it becomes available.

Note for teachers: This page contains materials including videos, interactive activities, audio, documents, information about webinars, etc. designed to support your instruction and enhance your students' learning. Resources provided are aligned to national teaching standards promoted by all Pulitzer NC partners.

Pulitzer NC Ekphrastic Poetry

Drawing on the long history of art inspiring poetry, Craven Arts Council and Gallery (CAC&G) held an ekphrastic poetry competition during its annual Juried Exhibition, part of the Pulitzer NC Coastal Plains program. Poets young and old from across the state of North Carolina viewed the show and wrote a poem inspired by one piece. Here is the book with the winning art entries and the poems they inspired.

 

Student Responses to Old South/New South Exhibit

Read Amy Bagwell’s Central Piedmont Community College Lit II (post Civil War) students’ responses to the Pulitzer NC Old South/New South exhibit.

 

Student Discussion Board Entries in Response to the Old South/New South Pulitzer NC Panel

Central Piedmont Community College students in Liz Rogers’ Mass Media class developed these entries for extra credit in response to the following prompt: Explain what you learned about the Pulitzer Prize winning works and those who created them from the panel discussion. Discuss what insights, comments and/or ideas from the panelists affected you the most and why. Also discuss what the cartoonist or photographer's work reveals about the time in which it was created.
 
From Jennifer Roberts:
 
  The Old South/New South Through Media panel discussion provided clarity on what the editorial cartoons did for progression of racial equality, equal opportunity for women and technological advancements from the Old South to the New South era. Mark West, Chair of the English Department at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, detailed the body of Pulitzer Award-winning editorial cartoons for Doug Marlette. The cartoons take place in an imaginary bypass town of North Carolina called “Kudzu.” In this town, there is a man by the name of Rev. Will B. Dunn who represents the Old South. Marlette’s story-lines for the cartoons reveal how Rev. Will B. Dunn clashes with members of the New South who are younger and desire more progressive change. The use of satire in the cartoons helps enlighten the audiences to old south ways that are outdated, racists, sexist and revealing society’s double standards. “Rev. Will B. Dunn is sort of a representative of the Old South,” West said. “You see these tension between the characters that represent the New South and the character of Rev. Will B. Dunn representing the Old South.” The comparison of Old South oppression to the New South era through editorial cartoons showed that the cycle of racial injustices and ideologies still continues in present day. The fight for the New South is a currently battling the same oppressive thinkers of the Old South.
 
  The exhibit had a reader favorites wall from Kevin Siers, 2014 Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist for the Charlotte Observer. Siers channeled the racial tensions of present day in the cartoon “America’s Conversation on Race and Violence Continues”, a picture reflecting the July 7th police shootings of the Dallas Police officers by an African American man. The cartoon, a police officer sitting opposite a black male while subdued in their hands, speaks volumes to Old South continued oppression through editorial cartoons. Siers said this type of cartoon disruption embodies the role of the cartoonist in today’s Democracy. The most telling piece of this cartoon picture created in July is how it embodied the current state of police and African American relations today. The second picture that Siers captures of present day chaos is a picture of Hillary Clinton wearing shades in a chair while deleting emails off her server. The pictures captions “Since 2009, federal regulations require all e-mails be preserved as part of an agency’s record- keeping system.” Siers award -winning work provide two additional cartoons that add to the political climate relevant to the election. In one cartoon, President Obama is holding a gun bill with the caption “Yes, We”, with a picture of a republican congressman holding a bag of gun money with the caption “Can’t”. In a second cartoon, Siers captures six moments of the NRA convincing the American people that the second amendment keeps everyone safe by requiring people with guns everywhere at all times. Collectively, Siers Pulitzer Award-winning pictures defined the state of Congress not respecting the President and the fear of second amendments infringements for gun owners. The cartoons connected to Prominent leaders with significant issues people care about, thus making Siers' cartoons worthy of Pulitzer Award recognition.
 
From Rishton Cunningham:
 
   I enjoyed the panel discussion and especially enjoyed the work and words of Kevin Siers. I found it interesting that he started drawing cartoons for the local community paper on his breaks while working in the Louisville Iron Ore Mines. It was impressive to hear that his cartoons have been published not only in the Charlotte Observer, but also in the New York Times, The Washington Post, Newsweek and USA Today. Siers said that the cartoonists' greatest tool is satire and they use it to try and get people to see things differently. This was evidenced by his cartoons dealing with race relations in Charlotte over the years. It made me realize how powerful cartoons can be and how the cartoonists can be the voice of change. Siers talked about a cartoon he drew in 1990 after the Myers Park Country Club, which was "whites only" at the time, held a party with a "Gone with the Wind" theme. After the cartoon was published in The Observer, the club decided that maybe "whites only" was not a good thing. Siers drew other cartoons about race relations in Charlotte which reflected the culture at the time. It sadly struck me how relevant those cartoons still are today, especially with the events in Charlotte last week.
 
      All of the works on exhibit were amazing. A few pictures in particular caught my attention. In one photograph, John H. White captures the moment after President Obama wins the election. The photo shows people of all races and national origins celebrating and holding up the American flag. It represents to me the great diversity in our country and showed the appeal of Obama to all people of our country at the time. Obama's election was so historic as he was the first minority to be elected President. The minorities in the photo depict the significance of that event. It was important because it explains why he was elected and what was important in our culture at that time. I can see why Mr. White's work was deserving of a Pulitzer Prize. He has an artistically effective way of capturing culture and depicting feelings and conveying them without any words.  A cartoon I found funny and interesting was drawn by Kevin Siers. It reads "Online Game Avatars" and cleverly depicts a concern of the times using figures from current pop culture. It speaks to the people's concern over too much government involvement and more specifically, the concern of the National Security Association possibly spying on citizens. It makes light of the situation using video game characters. I can relate to this image because of our current obsession with video gaming and the current technology which could allow the government to invade our privacy. I think the Pulitzer Prize committee selected works by Kevin Siers because of his creative way of showing issues and public concerns in a humorous yet thought provoking way. His drawings reflect the issues of the era in which they were drawn giving them historical significance.

Student Responses to the Pulitzer Panel

The Sample Feature Writing blog entries below were created by Central Piedmont Community College journalism students in Liz Rogers’ class in response to the following prompts:

  1. Pre-Pulitzer Panel: discuss a Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph from John H. White or a Pulitzer Prize-winning carton from Kevin Siers, Doug Marlette, or Gene Payne. Then both describe the image and interpret its meaning and possible effect on the viewer.
     
  2. After Pulitzer Panel: after attending the panel sponsored by the NC Humanities Council, discuss what you learned about the Pulitzer Prize winning works that you did not know already. Discuss the insights, comments and/or ideas from the panelists that affected you the most and why. Also, select the work of one of the cartoonists or photographer John H. White (based on previous viewing, panel information and the exhibit), and explain why you think the Pulitzer committee selected this individual’s body of work for such a prestigious award. Illustrate your ideas by referring to at least two images.

Jasmin's Journal: The Science Of Style

WillsWord: Halloween in Chapel Hill

Agree to Disagree with Ginny... or not: Editor to Reporter: An art walk with purpose.

Mingle Mania: Chatting and Reviewing

Beauty of Travel: Halloween from different perspectives.

People, Places and Stories: Pulitzer Discussion Panel

 

Teaching Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman Webinar

January 12, 2017 - 7-8:30 P.M.
Teaching Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman
Leader: Andrew Sofer, Professor of English, Boston College
Collaborator: National Humanities Center
Free event but registration is required.

The Poetry of Rita Dove Webinar

January 19, 2017 - 7-8:30 p.m.
Leader: Rita Dove, Commonwealth Professor of English, University of Virginia
Collaborator: National Humanities Center
Free event but registration is required.

 

NC Pulitzer Prize winners

Want to learn more about North Carolina Pulitzer Prize winners? Check out these incredible resources collected by Charlotte Mecklenburg Library librarian Amanda Davis.

Every Day Life

Every Day Life, a film by Rodrigo Dorfman commissioned by the North Carolina Humanities Council
For more than 40 years, José Galvez has used black and white film to create a powerful and unparalleled historical record of the Latino experience in America. His compelling work, done with respect, pride and no pretense, captures the beauty of daily life. In 1984, he was on a team of reporters and photographers at the Los Angeles Times that won a Pulitzer Prize for a series on Latino life in southern California. Galvez was the first Chicano to win this award. He currently lives in Durham, NC. See the full length documentary below.

Paul Green Revisited

Paul Green Revisited, a film by Rodrigo Dorfman commissioned by the North Carolina Humanities Council
In 1927,  Paul Green won the Pulitzer Prize in Drama for In Abraham’s Bosom, a play about the life and times of an African American teacher. The work was staged for the first time south of the Mason-Dixon line in 2016. See the full length documentary below.

Old South/New South through Media Radio Spots

Listen to the great promo spots created by Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC) Broadcast Speech students Jennifer Roberts and Ismail Out, under the guidance of professor Danielle Kosir. The spots promote the exhibit presented at  CPCC on September 27, 2016 part of a full-day of events titled: Pulitzer NC Old South/New South through Media.

Remembering 'Kudzu' Cartoonist Doug Marlette

Doug Marlette was known for his comic strip Kudzu, but he was also a Pulitzer-winning editorial cartoonist — and the only cartoonist ever awarded the prestigious Nieman journalism fellowship. Hear his 1987 interview with Terry Gross. 

Experiencing King

Experiencing King - A Conversation with Pulitzer Prize Winner David Garrow
9/17/2016, 2:30 PM  
James B. Hunt Library - Duke Energy Hall
North Carolina State University Centennial Campus
1070 Partners Way, Raleigh, NC 27695            
    
David J. Garrow is Professor of Law & History and Distinguished Faculty Scholar at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. His book, Bearing the Cross: Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, won the 1987 Pulitzer Prize in Biography and the seventh annual Robert F. Kennedy Book Award. Garrow is also the author of The FBI and Martin Luther King, Jr. and Protest at Selma, as well as editor of The Montgomery Bus Boycott and The Women Who Started It: The Memoir of Jo Ann Gibson Robinson. He served as a senior advisor for “Eyes on the Prize,” the award-winning PBS television history of the American Black freedom struggle, and as editorial advisor for the Library of America’s two-volume Reporting Civil Rights. Garrow regularly contributes to The Washington Post, The New York Times, and The American Prospect, and in recent years his essays and articles also have appeared in The New Republic, The Los Angeles Times, the Atlantic Monthly, The New York Review of Books, Newsweek and The Nation. He is currently working on a new book titled Rising Star: The Making of Barack Obama.  

Contact Victoria Gallagher:
919-515-1806
vgallagh@ncsu.edu  

Worship & Tribute: A Reading of Pulitzer Winning Work

Local Poetry Reading 

Friday, October 7
Goodyear Arts Building (goodyeararts.com
Beginning at 7 pm. 

Featured readers:
Amy Bagwell
Jeff Jackson
C.T. McGaha
Justin Evans
Katelyn Claesson 

Reading from Pultizer Prize-winning works by: 
John Ashbery
John Berryman
Sylvia Plath
James Tate
& More

Paul Green Revisited Trailer

Paul Green Revisited, a film by Rodrigo Dorfman commissioned by the North Carolina Humanities Council
In 1927,  Paul Green won the Pulitzer Prize in Drama for In Abraham’s Bosom, a play about the life and times of an African American teacher. The work was staged for the first time south of the Mason-Dixon line in 2016.

Every Day Life Trailer

Every Day Life, a film by Rodrigo Dorfman commissioned by the North Carolina Humanities Council
For more than 40 years, José Galvez has used black and white film to create a powerful and unparalleled historical record of the Latino experience in America. His compelling work, done with respect, pride and no pretense, captures the beauty of daily life. In 1984, he was on a team of reporters and photographers at the Los Angeles Times that won a Pulitzer Prize for a series on Latino life in southern California. Galvez was the first Chicano to win this award. He currently lives in Durham, NC.

Cold Reads / Charlotte

This local group hosts readings of plays for members of the community. Earlier this year, the group’s founder, George Gray, announced plans to celebrate the Pulitzer Prizes’ centennial by conducting “cold reads” of every winning play. 

Click here to read a story that ran in the Charlotte Observer.

NC Pulitzer Winners

The Pulitzer Prizes hold a prominent and cherished place in North Carolina history. Dating back to 1924, at least 19 prizes have been awarded to journalists, editorial writers and cartoonists, playwrites, and other talented writers who call our state home. Five North Carolina newspapers have been awarded Pulitzer’s prestigious prizes for meritorious public service, some multiple times. And the Tar Heel State, particularly Charlotte, must be fertile ground for editorial cartooning: three cartoonists on the staff of the Charlotte Observer have been honored with Pulitzers. Following is a complete list of prizes that have gone to North Carolinians past and present.

 

Read the articles that won Maria Henson a Pulitzer Prize for editorial writing in 1992 for her editorials about battered women in Kentucky, which focused statewide attention on the problem and prompted significant reforms.

 

Pulitzer-Prize winning editorial cartoons 

See the Pulitzer-Prize worthy bodies of work by cartoonists Gene Payne, Doug Marlette, and Kevin Siers.  

 

PTL Television Ministry

Read the articles that helped The Charlotte Observer team win a Pulitzer Prize for Public Service in 1988 for revealing misuse of funds by the PTL television ministry.

 

Read the Article that helped Karen Garloch, part of a team of reporters and editors become Pulitzer finalists (Local Reporting, 2013).

Bookmarks Summer Reading Program

K-12 students across North Carolina: Participate in the Bookmarks Summer Reading Program for the chance to win free books, cash prizes and more! Read a Pulitzer Prize-winning book on the list below, and then tell us what you learned or felt in artwork, a video, poem or written report. Response deadline: August 11. Winners notified: August 31. Cash prizes will be presented at the September 10 Bookmarks Festival of Books and Authors. For more information, check out the Summer Reading Guide here. 

The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt

Empire Falls by Richard Russo

The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Michael Chabon

Interpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri

Devil In The Grove by Gilbert King

Carry Me Home by Diane McWhorter

Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout

The Road by Cormac McCarthy

Beloved by Toni Morrison

The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton

The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

The Sixth Extinction by Elizabeth Kolbert

The Hours by Michael Cunningham

A Visit From the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan

William Cooper’s Town: Power and Persuasion on the Frontier of the Early American Republic by Alan Taylor

The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia: 1772 – 1832 by Alan Taylor